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War Ware Warm Colors
Warp Warp-faced Weave Warping
Wash Wash Watercolor
Watercolor paintings Wax Resist Weathering
Weave Weaving Wedge or Wedging
Weft Weft-faced Weft-faced Weave
Wenge Wood Western Art Wheel Engraving
Wheel Thrown White-line cut Whiteware
Wood sculptures Woodcut Wrapping
Wrought
War Ware Warm Colors
In weaving, the threads that run lengthwise in a fabric, crossed at right angles by the weft. Also, the process of arranging yarn or thread on a loom so as to form a warp.
Ceramic objects.
Those which suggest a sense of warmth i.e.: red, yellow and orange. Colors whose relative visual temperature makes them seem warm. Warm colors or hues include red-violet, red, red-orange, orange, yellow-orange, and yellow.
Warp Warp-faced Weave Warping
The yarn which runs the long way in cloth made on a loom. It is under tension during weaving and is usually stronger than the 'weft' or 'fill' yarns which run across it.
A fabric or rug in which the warp predominates, completely covering the weft.
Distortion of a clay form caused by uneven stresses during shaping, drying or firing. The process of preparing the warp for beaming on the loom, including measuring, establishing the cross, and chaining.
Wash Wash Watercolor
A thin, translucent layer of pigment, usually watercolor. Coloring oxide mixed with water.
Used in watercolor painting, brush drawing, and occasionally in oil painting and sculpture to describe a broad thin layer of diluted pigment, ink, glaze or patina. Also refers to a drawing made in this technique.
A painting medium in which the binder is gum arabic. Water is used to thinning, lightening or mixing. 1. A painting compound of water-soluble pigment. A type of paint in which the pigments are dissolved in water. The binding material is usually made of glue, casein, or gum. It comes in paste or hardened cake form.
Watercolor paintings Wax Resist Weathering
Watercolor can be a delicate art, or totally strident, depending entirely upon the artist and their personal style. Watercolor can be a delicate art, or totally strident, depending entirely upon the artist and their personal style. Watercolors are usually done on special sheets, though there are many other possibilities.
Wax emulsion or melted wax is used to create patterns on ceramics. The wax is painted onto unfired ceramic ware to keep those pattern areas from being covered in slip or glaze. Next, the piece is painted with slip or glaze and then fired. The firing melts the wax and reveals the unfired clay beneath it. Wax resist can also be used to retard the drying of leather-hard ware.
The exposure of raw clay to natural elements which break down particle size and render the clay more plastic.
Weave Weaving Wedge or Wedging
The particular pattern in which the warp and the weft come together.
The process by which the warp and weft are interlaced at right angles to form a continuous fabric.
Mixing and removing the air form plastic clay by cutting it diagonally and slamming the pieces together.
Weft Weft-faced Weft-faced Weave
In weaving, the horizontal threads interlaced through the warp. Also called woof.
A tapestry weave in which the yarn running the short way is dominant in the design.
A fabric or rug in which the weft dominates and completely covers the warp.
Wenge Wood Western Art Wheel Engraving
A wood from tropical western African countries that is dark brown to black with a fine black veining.
Depicts life of Western America through cowboys, Indians, landscapes, and images of western life. The medium can be either painting or sculpture.
Glass that has 'gouge's carved into its face by holding it against assorted vertical wheels. Cut glass decanters or stemware are wheel engraved. Also called 'brilliant cutting'.
Wheel Thrown White-line cut Whiteware
Forming of pottery by the action of the potter's fingers and hands against clay centered on the revolving platform of a potter's wheel.
A relief print where the nonprinting lines form the subject, producing a design with white lines on an inked background.
A generic term for white clay bodies.
Wood sculptures Woodcut Wrapping
Wood also varies in color shape and price. Working with wood could be easier than working with stone or metal, unless the sculpture is very large and requires professional carpentry machines.
A print made by carving out a design on a wood block, then applying ink to the raised surfaces, and printing on paper. This technique can be used with relief printing, as well as with many other pictorial or ornamental designs.
The process whereby fibers, yarns or other materials are wrapped around a core material.
Wrought
Shaped by beating or hammering, often elaborately, for decorative effect. Wrought iron is a low-carbon metal that can be elongated without breaking and is resistant to corrosion.

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