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S/N Saddle Stitching Saggar
Saki-ori Salon Salt Firing
Salt Glaze Sand Casting Sandblasting
Sapele Wood Sashiko Saturation
Scale Scavo School of Art
Sconce Scoring Scouring
Scraping Scratching Screen-print
Sculpture Scumbling Secondary Color
Secondary Market Secretary (or Secretaire) Seed
Selenium Self Storing Leaves Selvage
Sepia Serigraph Sfumato
Sgraffito Shade Shaft
Shaker Shape Shard
Shed Sheen Sheer
Shoji Screen Shot Shrinkage
Shutter Shuttle Sideboard
Sigillata Silhouette Silica
Siligraphy Silkscreen Printing Silver
Silver Gelatin Silver Process Print Simultaneous Contrast
Sisal Site Specific Art Size or Sizing
Sketch Slab Sleigh Bed
Sling Casting Slip Slip Casting
Slip Clay Slip Glaze Slip Tenon
Slip Trailing Slumped Glass Slurry
Soda Firing Sofa Table Solder
Solid Casting Soluble Space
Spalted Spinning Spit Bite
Spline Split Sprues
Squeegee Stain Stained Glass
Stakes Stamping Stamping
Steam Bend Steel Stencil
Sterling Silver Still Life Stipple
Stippling Stone Lithography Stone Sculptures
Stoneware Storyboard Stretched Canvas
Stretching Stringer Stucco
Study Style Stylized
Subtractive Color Mixture Subtractive Sculpture Suede
Sugar Lift Summer and Winter Support
Surface Decoration Surrealism Surrealist
Symbol Symbolism Symmetrical
Synthetic
S/N Saddle Stitching Saggar
This symbol is used to indicate that a limited edition print has been signed and numbered by the artist himself/herself.
A two-handed stitching technique using a needle at both ends of a single thread. It produces a uniform stitch on both sides of the leather.
1. Refractory container or fire-clay box in which pottery is stocked during firing for protection from direct flame; can be used routinely in wood-burning kilns. 2. A container for holding fuming materials such as metal oxides, chemical salts, and organic substances, that will act on the ware in the saggar during the fire.
Saki-ori Salon Salt Firing
A cloth made with a rag weft, also known by a number of other names in various areas of Japan.
1. Fashionable gathering of artists, writers, and intellectuals held in a private home .2. In France, a state-sponsored exhibition of art, held in Paris, controlled by the Academy of Fine Arts. A general term for a group art exhibition in France.
Traditionally, rocksalt is thrown into the fire at the maturing temperature of the clay until an orange-peel textured clear glaze appears; contemporarily, any sodium put into a kiln at any temperature, or during a post-firing after a work has already been fired once; salt is deleterious to kiln bricks.
Salt Glaze Sand Casting Sandblasting
A glaze created during high-temperature firings. Sodium, usually in the form of rock salt, is introduced into the fully heated kiln and forms a clear coating on the clay, often with an orange-peel texture. Also referred to as Salt Firing Traditionally, rocksalt is thrown into the fire at the maturing temperature of the clay until an orange-peel textured clear glaze appears; contemporarily, any sodium put into a kiln at any temperature, or during a post-firing after a work has already been fired once; salt is deleterious to kiln bricks.
An ancient and still widely used casting method in which moistened sand is packed against a model to make a mold.
A method of etching the surface of a material by spraying it with compressed air and sand.
Sapele Wood Sashiko Saturation
A light gold to reddish-brown wood from the Ivory Coast and Nigeria.
A traditional Japanese plain-stitch embroidery used as a decorative strengthener or for warmth, stitching two or more layers of cloth together in a form of quilting.
The purity or intensity of a hue or color on a scale from bright (full saturation) to dull (low saturation) chromatic purity. The degree of difference from the achromatic light-source color of the same brightness.
Scale Scavo School of Art
Size in relation to some “normal” or constant size. Compare with proportion.
A technique developed in Italy for giving glass the antiquated, dug-up appearance of archeological artifacts. (Scavo means “unearthed.”) A special powder mixture is sprinkled on the surface of the glass and set into the glass by multiple firings.
A group of artists whose work demonstrates a common influence or unifying belief. Schools of art are often defined by geographic origin. When the term is applied to a particular artist, it may refer to work done by the artist’s pupils or assistants or to work that imitates the artist’s style.
Sconce Scoring Scouring
A light fixture fixed on a wall. Commonly sconces are tall and narrow and are often made to hold a candle.
To make lines, grooves, scratches, or notches in clay so that it can be joined together, usually in a cross-hatch pattern, to give each surface a better grip. To mark an object with this technique.
A thorough cleaning that removes dirt and oils from fabrics. Fabrics are always scoured before dyeing.
Scraping Scratching Screen-print
The use of a serrated edge to decorate dry clay.
The use of a serrated edge to decorate plastic clay.
A printmaking technique in which stencils are applied to fabric stretched across a frame. Paint or ink is forced with a squeegee through the unblocked portions of the screen onto paper or other surface beneath. (serigraphy)
Sculpture Scumbling Secondary Color
A three-dimensional form modeled, carved, or assembled.
The technique of partially obscuring a work's precision of line or brilliance of color by applying a semi-opaque layer of paint atop the underpainting. Also refers to the act of rubbing the surface of a work to smear lines and soften the image.
A hue created by combining two primary colors, as yellow and blue mixed together yield green. In pigment the secondary colors are orange, green, and violet.
Secondary Market Secretary (or Secretaire) Seed
The market that exists for artwork once owned by a private individual.
A drop-leaf desk normally sitting on a base of drawers, usually with slots and cubbyholes for organizing papers.
A tiny bubble in a piece of glass.
Selenium Self Storing Leaves Selvage
A single bath toner used to change black-and-white prints in the developing stage. Selenium tones range from pure black to purple-black to a deep red.
Leaves that store within an extension table.
The lengthwise or warp wise edge of a woven fabric; the point at which the weft binds the warp to form a finished edge.
Sepia Serigraph Sfumato
Sepia is a reddish-brown pigment, produced from the ink of octopus and cuttlefish that is used in watercolor and ink drawing. In photography some toning processes produce a sepia-tone print, often to give the impression of a very old photograph. Warm, reddish-brown pigment produced from octopus or cuttlefish ink, used in watercolor and drawing ink.
A form of print making which utilizes stencils attached to porous screens that support delicate areas of the cut design. Most often issued in signed and numbered editions.Serigraphy is a color stencil printing process in which a special paint is forced through a fine screen onto the paper beneath. Areas that do not print are blocked with photo sensitive emulsion that has been exposed with high intensity arc lights. A squeegee is pulled from back to front, producing a direct transfer of the image from screen to paper. A separate stencil is required for each color and one hundred colors or more may be necessary to achieve the desired effect. A serigraph, also referred to as a screen print, differs from other graphics in that its color is made up of paint films rather than printing ink stains. This technique is extremely versatile, and can create effects similar to oil color and transparent washes, as well as gouache and pastel.
From the Italian work for “smoke,” a technique of painting in thin glazes to achieve a hazy, cloudy atmosphere, often to represent objects or landscape meant to be perceived as distant from the picture plane.
Sgraffito Shade Shaft
A decorative process. A line is scratched through a layer of slip or glaze before firing to expose the clay underneath. From the Italian, meaning literally “to scratch.”
Any hue in the color spectrum with a particular amount of black added.
The internationally used term for the frame that supports a group of heddles on the loom (also called a harness in the United States). A group of shafts working together is called a harness.
Shaker Shape Shard
Relating to or constituting a style produced by Shakers that is distinctively simple, unornamented, functional and finely crafted.
A two-dimensional area having identifiable boundaries, created by lines, color, or value changes, or some combination of these; broadly, form.
A fragment of fired pottery. Also called "sherd".
Shed Sheen Sheer
The space between raised or lowered warp yarns through which the loaded shuttle is passed. A shed is created by raising or lowering one or more shafts.
A dull gleam on a surface, less bright than gloss.
Very thin or transparent.
Shoji Screen Shot Shrinkage
A freestanding Asian style screen, often used as a room divider.
One pass or row of weft through a shed; also called a “pick.”
Contraction of clays or bodies in drying and firing, caused by the loss of physical and chemical water and the achieving of molecular density.
Shutter Shuttle Sideboard
In photography, the part of the camera that controls the length of time the light is allowed to strike the photosensitive film.
A tool on which the weft is wrapped so that it can be passed through a shed in the warp.
A table for serving with a central drawer and storage in the form of shelves and compartments on either side.
Sigillata Silhouette Silica
See “terra sigillata.”
The outer shape of an object. An outline, often filled in with color.
Oxide of silicon; found abundantly in nature as quartz, sand and flint; the essential oxide in ceramics.
Siligraphy Silkscreen Printing Silver
A water-less planographic printmaking process based on the repellence of ink and silicone. Designs are drawn or painted with water-soluble art materials onto ground glass. The surface is then coated with silicone, covering the non-printing areas of the image and leaving the exposed areas to be coated in ink applied with a roller. The print is then made by pressing paper against the inked drawing.
A stencil process of printmaking in which an image is imposed on a screen of silk or other fine mesh, with blank areas coated with an impermeable substance, and ink is forced through the mesh onto the printing surface. Also called serigraphy and screen-printing. Andy Warhol and Robert Raushenberg used silkscreens as a means of applying paint to canvases. Also, a print made by this method, sometimes called a screenprint.
An element known for its purity, malleability and bright shine. Because pure silver is relatively soft, it is usually alloyed with a small amount of copper to make sterling.
Silver Gelatin Silver Process Print Simultaneous Contrast
A photographic process that uses silver halide crystals suspended within the photographic emulsion. The most popular type of black-and-white photograph produced today.
Generic term for several photographic processes, including silver bromo-chloride, silver chloro-bromide, velox, gaslight paper process/print and silver bromide. The most popular of these silver processes is silver bromide, which refers to photographic emulsions that use a gelatin emulsion of silver bromide as a halogen.
The tendency of complementary colors to seem brighter and more intense when placed side by side.
Sisal Site Specific Art Size or Sizing
A natural, durable fiber that is frequently used in rugs.
Any work made for a certain place, which cannot be separated or exhibited apart from its intended environment.
Any of several substances made from glue, wax, or clay, used as a filler for porous material such as paper, canvas or other cloth, or wall surfaces. Used to protect the surface from the deteriorating effects of paint, particularly oil paint.
Sketch Slab Sleigh Bed
A preliminary drawing of a composition.
Flat piece of clay from which shapes can be fabricated.
A 19th-century American adaptation of a popular French Empire design. The sleigh bed has a high, scrolled headboard and footboard resembling the front of a sleigh.
Sling Casting Slip Slip Casting
A low-tech method of creating the centrifugal force needed to create precise castings in some metals.
A mixture of clay and water used to cast pots, apply surface decoration or cement separately formed parts.
A process of forming a clay object by pouring clay slip into a hollow plaster mold.
Slip Clay Slip Glaze Slip Tenon
A clay containing sufficient flux to become a glaze when fired to high temperatures.
The glaze that results from firing a clay past its maturing temperature until it melts; usually low-firing common surface clays taken to high temperature.
A piece of wood used to connect two pieces of wood together. The two pieces of wood being joined each have an opening (mortise), and one half of the slip tenon fits into each opening, thus joining the pieces together.
Slip Trailing Slumped Glass Slurry
A surface decoration technique in which the ceramist uses a nozzle to apply slip to the ware.
Preformed glass, such as sheet glass or blown glass rondelles, that has been reheated and shaped in a mold.
Thick suspension of one or more ceramic materials in water.
Soda Firing Sofa Table Solder
To glaze raw clay with vapors from soda ash or bicarbonate of soda introduced into fuel kiln during firing.
A table normally used behind a sofa or loveseat that has been positioned away from the wall or that is in the middle of a room.
An alloy of specific melting point and surface tension used to join metals.
Solid Casting Soluble Space
Casting liquid clay into the void created by two or more pieces of a mold; the thickness of the shape can vary.
Capable of being dissolved in liquid.
In painting, space may by defined as the distances between shapes on a flat surface and the illusion of three-dimensions on a two-dimensional surface. Also refers to a physical site where art is displayed for viewing.
Spalted Spinning Spit Bite
Wood that contains areas of natural decay, giving it distinctive markings. Spalted wood is used for its decorative effect.
1. The process of shaping a sheet metal disk by turning it with pressure against a form. 2. Spinning in textiles is the process of creating yarn (or thread, rope, cable) from various raw fiber materials.
A technique where the artist paints, drips or flings a strong acid solution directly onto the aquatint ground.
Spline Split Sprues
A piece of wood used in the production of fine furniture. A spline is used to hold two other pieces of wood together by intersecting the connection of those pieces of wood, thereby locking that intersection and making it impossible for them to separate.
The inner layer of the leather cut from the top grain portion.
The passageways the allow molten metal to enter a mold cavity in casting.
Squeegee Stain Stained Glass
A spatula-like tool made from hard but somewhat flexible plastic.
Any oxide of prepared pigment used for coloring bodies, slips or glazes.
1. Glass colored by mixing pigments inherently in the glass, by fusing colored metallic oxides onto the glass, or by painting and baking colors onto the surface. 2. Popular name for leaded glass, the process of forming objects using pieces of colored glass or glass that has been painted with liquid enamel and then fired. Pieces are fitted into channels in a lead strip or joined together using copper or cement.
Stakes Stamping Stamping
Rigid forms, typically of steel, against which metal is hammered to create volumetric forms in a process called “raising.”
1. A method of decoration by pushing objects against plastic clay. A technique using handmade or commercial metal stamps of damp leather to create a pattern, or to depress the background of a carved piece. 2. The technique of impressing shapes and textures through hardened tools called punches.
The process whereby fabrics or other fiber art are decorated with rubber stamps or other objects and inks or dyes.
Steam Bend Steel Stencil
A method of bending a single piece of wood (bowback chair, bowed splat, etc.) into a furniture part.
An alloy of iron and carbon.
The stencil technique uses a thin sheet of impenetrable, durable material with a design cut into it. A thin sheet of durable material with a pattern or design cut out so that paint or dye applied over the stencil will mark the underlying surface with the cut out design. (v) The technique of using a stencil. Silkscreen is an example of stencil technique.
Sterling Silver Still Life Stipple
An alloy containing 925 parts of fine silver in 1000 and 75 parts copper.
A painting or other two-dimensional work in which the subject matter is an arrangement of objects - fruit, flowers, tableware, pottery, and so forth - brought together for their pleasing contrasts of shape, color, and texture, Also the arrangement of the objects itself.
An intaglio printing process in which the design to be printed is composed of groups of dots rather than lines, resulting in areas of tone. Stipple may be accomplished by engraving or etching.
Stippling Stone Lithography Stone Sculptures
A pattern of closely spaced dots or small marks used to create a sense of three-dimensionally on a flat surface, especially in drawing and printmaking. See also hatching, cross-hatching.
A printing method that is based on the principle that oil and water do not mix. Using a greasy substance, an image is drawn or painted on to a flat stone. Next, the stone is moistened and the surface is then coated with an oil-based ink. Paper is pressed to the stone and the ink transfers the image onto the paper. The application of each color is printed separately through a careful alignment process called registration. The popularity of this process grew because thousands of replicas could be made which closely matched the color and graphic imagery of the original art.
Stone is a more expensive material, though there are different kinds of stone, which differ in their value. Marble can be more expensive than basalt, for instance. Each stone provides a different effect to the sculpture due to its shape, color and size. Sculpturing in stone also requires a special workshop and tools.
Stoneware Storyboard Stretched Canvas
A gray-, reddish- or buff-colored opaque clay body which matures (becomes nonporous) between 1900 to 2300F.
A panel on which a series of images, usually sketches, is arranged depicting the consecutive changes of action of a scene. This series of drawings prepares the artist for a movie, video, commercial or animation.
A term referring to canvas stretched and secured to a wood frame to be used for original paintings and print reproductions.
Stretching Stringer Stucco
The method by which a wheel thrown form is shaped from the inside.
Small diameter color rods of glass that are used in optic molds, laid on canes or used in other ways to apply lines of color to a piece.
A plaster finishing method that is usually rough and highly textured. Stucco is most often composed of plaster, lime, Portland cement, sand and small pebbles.
Study Style Stylized
A detailed drawing or painting made of one or more parts of a final composition, but not the whole work.
A characteristic, or a number of characteristics that we can identify as constant, recurring, or coherent. In art, the sum of such characteristics associated with a particular artist, group, or culture, or with an artist's work at a specific time.
Simplified or exaggerated visual form which emphasizes particular or contrived design qualities. Descriptive of works based on forms in the natural world, but simplified or distorted for design purposes. See also abstract.
Subtractive Color Mixture Subtractive Sculpture Suede
Combining of colored pigments in the form of paints, inks, pastels, and so on. Called subtractive because reflected light is reduced as pigment colors are combined. See additive color mixture.
Sculpture made by removing material from a larger block or form.
A type of leather in which the flesh side is buffed smooth. Suede splits are buffed on both sides.
Sugar Lift Summer and Winter Support
A process used in conjunction with aquatint in which the artist paints a positive design onto a plate with a solution of sugar, water and ink. The plate is then covered with a thin coat of acid-resist varnish, left to dry and then submerged in lukewarm water. As the sugar dissolves it lifts the varnish off the plate, exposing the bare surface beneath. The exposed area is then covered with aquatint and bitten.
A double-sided block weave with interior plain-weave tie-down warp threads. It is generally used to create geometric block-based designs.
The physical material that provides the base for and sustains a two-dimensional work of art. Paper is the usual support for drawings and prints; canvas and panels are supports in painting. The surface on which a work of two-dimensional art is made i.e.: canvas, paper, cardboard, or wood.
Surface Decoration Surrealism Surrealist
Many chemical and physical substances are applied to hot glass over a table on which a substance has been sprinkled. Commonly used are powdered or crushed glass and silver nitrate.
A painting style of the early 20th century that emphasized imagery and visions from dreams and fantasies, as well as an intuitive, spontaneous method of recording such imagery, often combining unrelated or unexpected objects in compositions .
Producing fantastic or incongruous imagery of affects by means of juxtaposition and combinations.
Symbol Symbolism Symmetrical
An image or sign that represents something else, because of convention, association, or resemblance.
An art style developed in the late 19th century characterized by the incorporation of symbols and ideas, usually spiritual or mystical in nature, which represent the inner life of people. Traditional modeled, pictorial depictions are replaced or contrasted by flat mosaic-like surfaces decoratively embellished with figures and design elements.
Descriptive of a design in which the two halves of a composition on either side of an imaginary central vertical axis correspond to one another in size, shape, and placement.
Synthetic
Unnatural. That which is produced or contrived by humans.
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