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Padauk Wood Painted Glass Painterly
Painting Palette Palette Knife
Palimpset Palissy Ware Palladium
Panorama Parian Ware Pastel
Pate de Verre Pate-sur-pate Patina
Pau Amarello Wood Peachbloom Glaze Pedestal
Pedestal Table Pediment Pen and Ink
Pentimento Perfume Vial Peroba Rosa Wood
Persimmon Wood Perspective Photo Realism
Photo Stencil Photo-emulsion Photoetching
Photogram Photograph Photographic Film
Photographic Transparency Photogravure Photomontage
Pickle Pictograph Pictorial Space
Picture Plane Picturesque Pier Glass
Piercing Pigment Pigment Print
Pinch Forming Pinhole Camera Pit Firing
Pitch Plain Weave Plangi
Planishing Planographic Plaster
Plastic Plasticity Plate Glass
Platinum Plein Air Plexiglas
Plying Photo Mechanical Transfer Pointillism
Polychromatic Polychrome Sand Polyptych
Pommele Pop Art Popanna
Porcelain Porosity Positive Etch
Positive Shape Positive Space Post Impressionism
Post Modern Pottery Powder
Powder Coating Pre-Columbian Prehistoric Art
Press Mold Pressing Primary Colors
Primary Market Primavera Glass Prime
Primitive Primitive Art Print
Printmaking Procion Dye Prong Settings
Proportion Publisher Proofs Punches
Punty Purple Heart Wood
Padauk Wood Painted Glass Painterly
A southeast Asian tree having reddish wood with a mottled or striped black grain.
Glass that has been painted with special paints and then fired so that the paint becomes a permanent part of the glass.
Descriptive of paintings in which forms are defined principally by color areas, not by lines or edges. Where the artist’s brushstrokes are noticeable. Any image that looks as though it may have been created with the style or techniques used by a painter. Painting characterized by openness of form, in which shapes are defined by loose brushwork in light and dark color areas rather than by outline or contour.
Painting Palette Palette Knife
A process whereby fabrics or other fiber art are decorated by hand with dyes or pigments.
Most commonly, the selected group of colors an artist chooses for a particular work or group of works. Also refers to the board or other surface on which a painter mixes his or her colors.
A flexible metal spatula used for mixing paint or applying paint to a surface.
Palimpset Palissy Ware Palladium
Any piece of parchment, canvas, panel or paper that has been reused, whether scraped clean, painted over or painted on the reverse side.
French faience with tin enamel glaze decorated in bright colors, developed during the 16th century.
A photographic process in which the image is produced by palladium crystals deposited on the paper. A steel-white and tarnish-resistant metallic element used in jewelry, watches and surgical equipment. Also called white gold.
Panorama Parian Ware Pastel
A wide view of a landscape.
Unglazed porcelain, looking like marble, used primarily in the manufacture of Victorian statuettes and doll heads; translucent, highly fluxed.
1. Sticks of powdered pigment held together with a gum binding agent. 2. Pale colors or tints. A colored crayon that consists of pigment mixed with just enough of a aqueous binder to hold it together; a work of art produced by pastel crayons; the technique itself. Pastels vary according to the volume of chalk contained...the deepest in tone are pure pigment. Pastel is the simplest and purest method of painting, since pure color is used without a fluid medium and the crayons are applied directly to the pastel paper. A combination of pure pigment and binder forming permanent colored sticks; noted for colors which go from soft to brilliant. When ground is completely covered with pigment, the work is considered pastel painting: leaving much of the ground exposed produces a pastel sketch.
Pate de Verre Pate-sur-pate Patina
Pate de Verre ("paste of glass") is the technique of making solid glass objects from crushed glass or glass frit. A glass paste of finely crushed glass is mixed, heated, poured into a mold, annealed or cooled, and ultimately freed from the mold. Similar to cast sculpture.
Literally, “paste-on-paste.” A decorating method consisting of built-up layers of engobe.
A film or an incrustation, often green, that forms on copper and bronze after a certain period of weathering and as a result of the oxidation of the copper. Different chemical treatments will also induce myriad colored patinas on new Bronze works. Bronzes may additionally be painted with acrylic and lacquer.
Pau Amarello Wood Peachbloom Glaze Pedestal
A Brazilian wood with a pale yellow to mustard color. Also known as yellowheart wood.
A copper reduction glaze famous in Sung Dynasty China, yellow-pink and red with green specks.
A support or foundation. For example, a sculpture may be mounted to a pedestal for display.
Pedestal Table Pediment Pen and Ink
A table supported by a single, central base.
An ornamental crest running across the top of tall 18th century piece such as a highboy or chest.
Pen and ink gives an effect that is somewhere between painting and drawing.
Pentimento Perfume Vial Peroba Rosa Wood
A condition of old paintings where lead-containing pigments have become more transparent over time, revealing earlier layers.
A small bottle with a narrow aperture intended to be closed with a stopper. The stopper may be used to apply vial contents to the body.
A wood that has a rose-red to yellow color, a straight grain, and a fine and uniform texture. Native to Brazil and Argentina.
Persimmon Wood Perspective Photo Realism
A wood native to eastern Asia. Common uses today include making period reproduction furniture of China, Korea and Japan, making wood golf clubs, and occasionally it is used by luthiers as the fingerboards, backs and sides of guitars.
The representation of three-dimensional objects on a flat surface so as to produce the same impression of distance and relative size as that received by the human eye. In one-point linear perspective, developed during the fifteenth century, all parallel lines in a given visual field converge at a single vanishing point on the horizon. In aerial or atmospheric perspective, the relative distance of objects is indicated by gradations of tone and color and by variations in the clarity of outlines.
A painting and drawing style of the mid 20th century in which people, objects, and scenes are depicted with such naturalism that the paintings resemble photographs    an almost exact visual duplication of the subject.
Photo Stencil Photo-emulsion Photoetching
A family of pre-imaged masking materials, where the image is produced by a photographic process rather than hand cutting.
In the context of ceramics, the process of developing a photograph directly onto a ceramic piece.
A printmaking technique in which a light-sensitive metal plate is exposed to photographic film under ultraviolet light. (Jewelry) A metal etching technique in which a pattern is painted onto metal and the metal is then exposed to acidic chemicals, which etch the uncovered areas.
Photogram Photograph Photographic Film
An image produced without optics or camera, by interposing a transparent, translucent or opaque object in a beam of light falling on the sensitive material (usually paper).
A relatively permanent image produced by the action of light on a sensitive material, commonly restricted to images or objects formed by means of optical devices, such as lenses or mirrors, as distinct from a sound recording, etc.
A flexible, transparent support coated with photosensitive material.
Photographic Transparency Photogravure Photomontage
An image (usually positive) intended to be observed by light that passes through the image and base as on a viewer or by projection.
A photomechanical printing process based on the production by photography of a plate (usually cylindrical) containing small ink-receptive pits. Commonly used in newspaper and art reproduction, in which the high quality and long-run characteristics of the process are useful.
1. A composite image, made by cutting and pasting, or by projecting several images in sequence on different parts of the receiving photographic material, such as photographic paper. 2. Any technique of making composite or multiple photographic images.
Pickle Pictograph Pictorial Space
An acidic solution used to clean metal.
A picture representing a word or idea, such as a hieroglyph.
The illusory space in a painting or other work of two-dimensional art that seems to recede backward into depth from the picture plane, giving the illusion of distance.
Picture Plane Picturesque Pier Glass
An imaginary flat surface that is assumed to be identical to the surface of a painting. Forms in a painting meant to be perceived in deep three-dimensional space are said to be behind the picture plane. The picture plane is commonly associated with the foreground of a painting.
As used in common language, picturesque means Forming, or fitted to form, a good or pleasing picture. Art historically, Picturesque is a style of landscape painting that emphasizes a sentimental aesthetic over the sublime. A style of landscape painting that reassures man of dominion over nature.
A large window height mirror suspended above a table.
Piercing Pigment Pigment Print
Decorative cuts through a clay form. (metal) Work done with a jeweler's saw, particularly when cutting within a shape.
A coloring substance made from plants, earth, or minerals and may include other synthetic elements. When mixed with binders it becomes paint, ink or crayon, etc.
A printing process by which an image is digitally rendered on an inkjet printer using archival pigment inks that have been laboratory tested to be fade resistant for 150 years.
Pinch Forming Pinhole Camera Pit Firing
A method of forming objects by pinching the clay wall with the fingers.
Camera with a tiny aperture that forms an image without use of a lens.
Firing to accomplish ceramic hardening in a hole in the ground or a cave.
Pitch Plain Weave Plangi
A slightly yielding substance used to support metal during repousse.
A basic weave of one up and one down in both the warp and the weft; also called tabby.
Woven fabric pattern-decorated by tie-dyeing: that is, by tying or knotting parts of the fabric so that it will not absorb the dye.
Planishing Planographic Plaster
The process of smoothing metal with polished hammers.
A type of printmaking where the ink is transferred to paper from a flat surface.
A calcium sulfate material that hardens when mixed with water. Used in ceramics for mold-making because it is absorbent and able to reproduce fine details.
Plastic Plasticity Plate Glass
1. Pliable; capable of being shaped. Pertaining to the process of shaping or modeling (i.e., the plastic arts). 2. Synthetic polymer substances, such as acrylic.
The quality of clay that allows it to be easily manipulated and still maintain its shape.
Any kind of glass made by the float method. The term is usually applied to glass over 1/8" in thickness.
Platinum Plein Air Plexiglas
Refers to a photographic process and the resulting print. Also called platinotype. The platinum process produces an image by depositing actual platinum crystals in the paper, the texture of which becomes integral to the print. Platinum prints are more stable than silver prints, but more costly. See also Palladium.
Literally, open air. Refers to the practice of painting outdoors to capture optimal light and atmosphere.
Trade name of a popular acrylic resin (plastic) that may be shaped by heating, casting or welding. Also used as an alternative to glass in picture framing.
Plying Photo Mechanical Transfer Pointillism
The process of twisting two or more strands of yarn or strips of cloth together.
A process that photographically translates a drawing into a black and white image on slick, glossy paper. Used to produce a film positive or to make a photo stencil.
A branch of French Impressionism in which the principle of optical mixture or broken color was carried to the extreme of applying color in tiny dots or small, isolated strokes. Forms are visible in a pointillist painting only from a distance, when the viewer’s eye blends the colors to create visual masses and outlines. The inventor and chief exponent of pointillism was George Seurat (1859-1891); the other leading figure was Paul Signac (1863-1935).
Polychromatic Polychrome Sand Polyptych
Having many colors, as opposed to monochromatic which means only one hue or color.
Layered sand with adhesive.
Artwork on more than three panels. Historically, painting or bas-relief set in an architectural frame or hinged together. Typically used as an altarpiece.
Pommele Pop Art Popanna
A wood term used in conjunction with wood names; the term means figure, which is the pattern produced in a wood surface by annual growth rings, rays, knots, deviations from natural grain such as interlocked and wavy grain, and irregular coloration.
A style derived from commercial art forms and characterized by larger than life replicas of items from mass culture. This style evolved in the late 1950s and was characterized in the 1960s by such artists as Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, Claus Oldenberg, Roy Lichtenstein, Larry Rivers, Robert Rauschenberg, George Segal, and Robert Indiana.
A Finnish style of cutting rag weft on the bias to allow for greater drape in blankets or clothing.
Porcelain Porosity Positive Etch
A ceramic ware fired to the highest temperature ranges and often used for dinnerware, vases, and smaller sculpture.
The capacity of a fired clay body to absorb moisture.
Etching the background so that the design is clear and unetched.
Positive Shape Positive Space Post Impressionism
A figure or foreground shape, as opposed to a negative ground or background shape.
The space in a painting occupied by the object depicted (not the spaces in-between objects)
A term applied to the work of several artists - French or living in France - from about 1885 to 1900. Although they all painted in highly personal styles, the Post-Impressionists were united in rejecting the relative absence of form characteristic of Impressionism and stressed more formal qualities and the significance of subject matter.
Post Modern Pottery Powder
An attitude or trend of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, in which artists and architects accept all that modernism rejects. In architecture, the movement away from or beyond what had become boring adaptations of the International Style, in favor of an imaginative, eclectic approach. In the other visual arts, Post-Modern is characterized by an acceptance of all periods and styles, including modernism, and a willingness to combine elements of all styles and periods. Although modernism makes distinctions between high art and popular taste, Post-Modernism makes no such value judgments.
A loosely-used term; often means earthenware or just any clay piece that has been fired.
Transparent or opaque glass in powder form. When picked up on hot glass and blown, the particles separate and melt to form a fine, airy layer of color. Multiple layers of powder coat a piece with color. Powder also creates unique interior effects when coated with another layer of transparent glass.
Powder Coating Pre-Columbian Prehistoric Art
Powder coating is a method of applying a decorative and protective finish by coating an item in the powder mixture of pigment and resin, and then curing that mixture in an oven, resulting in a uniform, durable, fused and smooth finish.
Art created in the America’s by native people that pre-dates the discovery of the new world
Art forms predating recorded history, such as Old, Middle, and New Stone Ages. Often the only record of early cultures.
Press Mold Pressing Primary Colors
A one-piece mold into which clay is pressed or casting slip is poured.
Forming objects by squeezing soft clay between two halves of a mold. Also, a method using fingers to impress a decoration in soft clay.
Any hue that, in theory, cannot be created by a mixture of any other hues. Varying combinations of the primary hues can be used to create all the other hues of the spectrum. In pigment the primaries are red, yellow, and blue. Theoretically, pigment primaries can be mixed together to form all the other hues in the spectrum.
Primary Market Primavera Glass Prime
The market that exists for artwork sold directly from an artist, dealer or gallery and not previously owned.
A Venetian glass-forming technique used to create a translucent glass with a crackled pattern.
In painting, a first layer of paint or sizing applied to a surface that is to be painted.
Primitive Primitive Art Print
Refers to a self-taught artist having or affecting a direct, unschooled style, or any work produced by such an artist.
1. Paintings and drawings of and by peoples and races outside the influence of accepted Western styles. 2. Religious portrayals predating scientific studies of perspective and anatomy.3. Intuitive artists with a "naive" style often due to little, if any, training (or works intentionally made to look  this way).
An image created from a master wood block, stone, plate, or screen, usually on paper. Prints are referred to as multiples, because as a rule many identical or similar impressions are made from the same printing surface, the number of impressions being called an edition. When an edition is limited to a specified number of prints, it is a limited edition. A print is considered an original work of art and today is customarily signed and numbered by the artist. A print is a graphic image that has been duplicated one or more times. There are various techniques used to create a print, such as serigraphy (or silk screening), lithography, etching, and offset printing. Prints, especially limited editions, are considered fine art and can be highly valued.
Printmaking Procion Dye Prong Settings
Printmaking is a process in which ink is transferred onto paper from another source, generally a plate (metal) or a block (wood).
Trade name of a fiber-reactive cold-water dye used to apply color to fabric or fiber.
Stone mountings in which "fingers" of metal secure the gems.
Proportion Publisher Proofs Punches
Size relationships between parts of a whole, or between two or more objects perceived as a unit.
Prints given to a print publisher by the artist, in recognition of a job well done. When a publisher is given proofs, the proofs are signed by the artist and each is inscribed as a publisher proof (PP). Publisher proofs are on the same paper as the edition and are essentially identical to the artist proofs (see the glossary term: Artist Proofs). Publisher proofs are considered of higher value than the proofs in the numbered edition because of their limited quantity.
Hardened steel tools used to decorate, texture and form metal.
Punty Purple Heart Wood
A solid steel rod used to pick up and transfer hot glass during the glass blowing and forming process
A wood that is known for its violet-purple coloring. Purple heart grows from Mexico to tropical South America.
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