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Icon Ikebana Ilfochrome
Illumination Impasto Impermeability
Impressing Impressionism Incalmo
Incising Inclusions Infrared Photography
Ingot Ink Inlay
Installation Art Insuring Originality Intaglio
Intarsia Intensity Interlocking Weft
Intermediate Color International Style Investment
Iridized Glass Iris Print Iron Oxide
Icon Ikebana Ilfochrome
A symbol or emblem. An image or symbolic representation often with sacred significance. Also refers to a Byzantine-style painting, mosaic or other art form of a sacred personage, traditional to Eastern Christian churches. Iconography The symbolic meanings of subjects and signs used to convey ideas important to particular cultures or religions, and the conventions governing the use of such forms.
The Japanese art of arranging flowers.
A trademarked photographic paper and the process of making prints with such paper. Ilfochrome prints are produced from slides or transparencies, not color negatives. Ilfochrome was formerly named Cibachrome.
Illumination Impasto Impermeability
Hand-drawn decoration or illustration in a manuscript, especially prevalent in medieval art.
A thick, juicy application of paint to canvas or other support; emphasizes texture, as distinguished from a smooth flat surface. In painting, thick paint applied to a surface in a heavy manner, having the appearance and consistency of buttery paste.
In ceramics this term refers to the property which results when clay forms have been rendered non-porous by vitrification, i.e. those which have achieved maximum density without melting in a kiln.
Impressing Impressionism Incalmo
Method of decorating by stamping into a clay surface.
A painting technique in which the artist concentrates on the changing effects of light and color. Often this style can be characterized by its use of discontinuous brush strokes and heavy impasto. Depicts the natural appearances of objects by means of dabs or strokes of primary unmixed colors in order to stimulate actual reflected light.The impressionist style of painting is characterized chiefly by concentration on the general impression produced by a scene or object and the use of unmixed primary colors and small strokes to simulate actual reflected light. An art movement founded in France in the last third of the 19th century. Impressionist artists sought to break up light into its component colors and render its ephemeral play on various objects. The artist’s vision was intensely centered on light and the ways it transforms the visible world. This style of painting is characterized by short brush strokes of bright colors used to recreate visual impressions of the subject and to capture the light, climate and atmosphere of the subject at a specific moment in time. The chosen colors represent light which is broken down into its spectrum components and recombined by the eyes into another color when viewed at a distance (an optical mixture). The term was first used in 1874 by a journalist ridiculing a landscape by Monet called Impression - Sunrise.
A glassblowing technique used to create horizontal or vertical bands of color by forming and connecting cylinders of colored glass.
Incising Inclusions Infrared Photography
Engraving a decoration into unfired clay.
Particles of metal, bubbles, etc. occurring naturally within glass or added for decorative effect.
Photography created using infrared film. Although the same equipment and processing solutions can be used for infrared and standard silver gelatin photography, infrared photography involves different techniques regarding lighting, filters and exposure settings. Due to these additional, difficult skills, infrared photography is often attempted only by skilled photographers, scientists and technicians with a particular purpose in mind.
Ingot Ink Inlay
A massive unit of metal, typically cast as the first step in creating sheet and wire of a more usable size.
A color liquid derived from natural acids or synthetic dyes. Used for drawing, writing and printing.
In woodworking, a technique in which small pieces of wood, often with varying grains and colors, are glued together to make a pattern.
Installation Art Insuring Originality Intaglio
Art works of various media, such as painting, sculpture, and projected images that fill a certain space and are used to create an idea or story for the viewer.
Making sure the piece you buy is an original. At Arttowngifts.com we provide a statement of authenticity for all original work and limited edition items.
Any printmaking technique in which lines and areas to be inked and transferred to paper are recessed below the surface of the printing plate. Etching, engraving, drypoint, and aquatint are all intaglio processes. The collective term for several graphic processes in which prints are made from ink trapped in the grooves in an incised metal plate. Etchings and engravings are the most typical examples. It may also refer to imagery incised on gems or hardstones, seals, and dies for coins, or to an object decorated in this way; which when pressed or stamped into a soft substance, produces a positive relief in that substance. Normally, copper or zinc plates are used as a surface, and the incisions are created by etching, engraving, drypoint, or mezzotint. Collographs may also be printed as intaglio plates. To print an intaglio plate, the surface is covered in ink, and then rubbed vigorously with tarlatan cloth or newspaper to remove the ink from the surface, leaving it only in the incisions. A damp piece of paper is placed on top, and the plate and paper are run through a printing press that, through pressure, transfers the ink from the recesses of the plate to the paper.
Intarsia Intensity Interlocking Weft
A decorative technique, derived from Oriental ivory inlays, that involves sinking a design across a wooden surface. Usually the inlay is made of non-wooden materials, such as ivory and metal.
The relative purity or saturation of a hue (color), on a scale from bright (pure) to dull (mixed with another hue or a neutral. Also called chroma. The degree of purity or brilliance of a color. The relative purity or grayness of a color.
A tapestry technique in which the two wefts wrap around each other (as opposed to the kilim or meet-and-separate technique).
Intermediate Color International Style Investment
A hue between a primary and a secondary color, such as yellow-green, a mixture of yellow and green.
An architectural style that emerged in several European countries between 1910 and 1920. Related to purism and De Stijl in painting, it joined structure and exterior design into a noneclectic form based on rectangular geometry and growing out of the basic function and structure of the building.
A plaster that contains cristobalite to allow it to remain solid at high temperatures. It is used to make molds in lost wax casting.
Iridized Glass Iris Print Iron Oxide
Flat or blown glass sprayed with a vapor deposit of metal oxides for an iridescent finish. The iridized layer, which resembles an oil slick, can be selectively removed for a two-tone effect.
The trademarked name for a digital print produced by an Iris Graphics inkjet printer. (See Giclee.)
Any of various oxides of iron, such as ferric oxide or ferrous oxide. The naturally occurring state of steel.
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Amaranth II, by Scott Spencer A Place by the Water, by Scott Spencer
Amaranth II Oil Painting
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A Place by the Water Oil Painting
Paintings Ship in 1 to 2 Bus Days
Reg Price   $749.99
On Sale   $699.99 Signed Original
   
 

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