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Cabochon Calciferous Powder Calligraphy
Came Cameo/Intaglio Canary Wood
Cane Canvas Canvas Transfer
Carat Carborundum Printmaking Caricature
Carnauba Wax Cartoon Cartouche
Carved Glass Carved Rug Carving
Cased Glass Casein Paint Cast
Cast Glass Casting Cathedral Glass
Celadon Glaze Ceramics Chamfer
Champleve Charcoal Chased
Chasing Chiaroscuro China
China Clay China Paint Chine Colle
Choke Ties Chrome Tanning Chromira
Chromogenic Chromo-lithograph Chrysocolla
Cibachrome Cinnabar Classical Style
Clay Clichi Verre Cloisonne
Cocobolo Wood Coil Cold Cast Bronze
Cold Connected Cold Mounting Collage
Collagraph Collogravure Color Field Painting
Color Wheel Comb Commission
Complementary Colors Composition Compound Miter Joint
Computer-aided Design Conceptual Art Cone
Constructed Construction Constructivism
Contact Print Cont Contemporary Art
Content Conti Crayon Contour
Contrapposto Contrast Converging
Cool Colors Copper Copper Foil Technique
Core Cornwall Stone Counterbalanced Loom
Countermarche Loom C-print Crackle
Cradle Hinge Craft Craftsmanship
Craquelere Crawling Crayon
Cross Pen Hammer Cross-draft Kiln Cross-hatching
Crown Setting Crystal Crystal(line) Glaze
Cubism Cuir-bouilli Curly
Curvilinear Cut glass Cuttlefish
Cabochon Calciferous Powder Calligraphy
A gemstone without facets that has a highly polished and rounded surface with a flat back. Stones normally finished with this technique are opal, moonstone, star ruby and sapphire. Also called a “carbuncle.”
Powder containing calcite or carbonate of lime.
The art of beautiful writing. Broadly, a flowing use of line, often varying from thick to thin. Artistic, stylized, or decorative handwriting or lettering, using a quill pen or brush, as in Chinese, Korean, or Japanese works.
Came Cameo/Intaglio Canary Wood
Pronounced like name. The extruded H-shaped channel which is fitted around individual pieces of glass so that they can be assembled into a panel. Came can be made of lead, zinc, brass or copper.
A technique in which the finished glass form is covered with another coating of glass of a different color into which is carved or etched a design which exposes the base color.
The name of wood that is applied to the timber of tulip, Australian eucalyptus, and Indian mulberry trees.
Cane Canvas Canvas Transfer
A thin glass rod formed by stretching a piece of hot glass; used for decorative accents.
Closely woven cloth used as a support for paintings. It is a plain, natural fiber cloth that is stretched over a frame, thus producing a flat, solid surface on which to paint
A canvas transfer is a print or poster image that has been transferred and fixed to a canvas surface. The result is a piece of printed art that has the appearance of an original canvas painting without the high cost usually associated with original artwork.
Carat Carborundum Printmaking Caricature
A unit of weight, originally determined by a carob seed, used in measuring gemstones. A carat contains 100 points. Not to be confused with "karat".
In carborundum printmaking, the areas in the plate which are to print black are covered with a mixture of carborundum, an industrially produced substance, and a binding agent. When dry that area retains ink just as in any other intaglio process. Carborundum printing gives a rich velvety surface.
A representation in which the subject’s distinctive features are exaggerated.
Carnauba Wax Cartoon Cartouche
A wax made from the palms of the carnauba tree, used for polishing fine furniture.
A humorous or satirical drawing. A drawing completed as a full-scale working drawing, usually for a fresco painting, mural, or tapestry.
An ornamental shield or scroll, often placed above door openings or fireplace mantels, that is often inscribed, carved, or painted.
Carved Glass Carved Rug Carving
Also called stage-blasted. Glass which has been sandblasted to different depths.
A rug in which the pile is cut to create a three-dimensional design or pattern.
A subtractive process in which a sculpture is formed by removing material from a block or mass of wood, stone, or other material, using sharpened tools. Carving is one of the oldest sculptural techniques. It is a reductive process; starting with a solid block, the sculptor removes material using chisels and other tools to ’reveal' the finished form. Traditional carving materials include stone, especially marble, and fine grained woods.
Cased Glass Casein Paint Cast
Blown glass that has two or more layers of different colors. The upper layers may be etched or sandblasted to reveal the glass underneath.
Also known as Buttermilk Paint, this paint has an opaque watercolor appearance and uses casein (a glue precipitated from  milk by rennin) as a binding ingredient. Casein paint may be used for light impasto on paper or board, for underpainting, wall decoration.
An impression made of an object, by pouring a plastic substance into a mold and letting harden, that is then filled with a substance such as plaster or metal to create a sculpture.
Cast Glass Casting Cathedral Glass
Molten glass that has been poured into a mold and allowed to anneal as a shaped form.
Casting is a method of producing one or more copies of a sculpture. Typically, the original sculpture is modeled as usual and covered with a moulding material which sets hard when dry. The mould is then separated to release the original sculpture. Once the mould is reassembled, the casting material is poured in to the void and left to set. Traditionally, molten bronze is used as the casting material, but modern alternatives include resin. When the cast sculpture has cooled, or cured, the mould is again separated to release it, and reassembled ready to cast the next copy.
Glass which is composed of the same ingredients as antique glass, but rolled or formed in a machine to a uniform texture.
Celadon Glaze Ceramics Chamfer
French name for a green, gray-green, blue-green or gray glaze produced with a small percentage of iron as the colorant.
Objects made of clay hardened into a relatively permanent material by firing. Also, the process of making such objects. Ceramics is a rather basic material for sculptures. It is not particularly expensive. It can be easily shaped into almost any figure when it is wet. After it dries it is usually burned in a special oven to keep it solid. Ceramics tend to break easily, so on delivery make sure it is handled carefully.
A beveled edge in metal art.
Champleve Charcoal Chased
A method for decorating metal in which hollowed-out areas are filled with colored enamel and then fired.
A dark, porous carbon, prepared by charring wood, that is used for drawing. Charcoal crayons are available in various degrees of thickness and hardness.
Metal patterned by striking with a hammer or other non-cutting tool. Applied to one surface of the metal only, this technique is often combined with repousse to achieve greater detail.
Chasing Chiaroscuro China
A technique in which steel punches are used to decorate and/or texture a metal surface.
In drawing, painting, and the graphic arts, chiaroscuro (ke-ra-skooro) refers to the rendering of forms through a balanced contrast between light and dark areas. The technique that was introduced during the Renaissance, is effective in creating an illusion of depth and space around the principal figures in a composition. Leonardo Da Vinci and Rembrandt were painters who excelled in the use of this technique.
1. A porcelain clay body, with up to one percent absorption, usually translucent; industry fires high to vitrification and glazes low; studio potters usually fire clay and glazes together to high temperatures by the traditional Asian method, or make low-fire porcelain by the European method. 2. Whiteware, vitreous and hard, sometimes translucent. 3. a general term used when discussing any kind of tableware.
China Clay China Paint Chine Colle
Primary or secondary kaolin, refractory, not very plastic, white burning, rare in the world, found in the U.S.A. in a few South-Eastern states; used in the blending of all whiteware and porcelain bodies.
Low fire glaze decoration applied to already glazed and fired whiteware or porcelain.
Small pieces of paper that are glued to a print in the printing process; added as visual embellishments.
Choke Ties Chrome Tanning Chromira
Lengths of cord wrapped tightly around the warp threads immediately after warping to maintain the order of the warp during its transfer to the loom.
Tanning process using salts of chromium to make leathers that are especially supple and suitable for bags, garments, etc.
Chromira prints are continuous tone photographic prints exposed digitally by a scanning LED light source. The Chromira is a digital enlarger that exposes photographic paper with LEDs. The photo paper is then processed in chemistry, creating a continuous-tone, true photographic print. It is different from inkjet printers because it exposes photographic paper (no ink is involved), whereas inkjet printers physically lay ink on paper or canvas.
Chromogenic Chromo-lithograph Chrysocolla
Identifying a substance or process that produces color.
A colored lithograph, with at least three colors, in which each color is printed from a separate surface (stone or aluminum) and where the image is composed from the layering of those colors.
A mineral of bluish-green color, occurring from the chemical reaction of exposing water, air and other elements to copper. Chrysocolla grows on copper and forms highly decorative patterns on nearby stones.
Cibachrome Cinnabar Classical Style
Cibachrome refers to both the trademarked photographic paper Cibachrome and the process of making prints with such paper. Cibachrome is a positive printing process; the prints are produced from slides or transparencies, not color negatives. Azo dyes embedded in the paper's emulsion are bleached away in proportion to the exposure during paper processing (called dye-bleach reversal).
Red sulfide of mercury used as pigment in painting.
1. The art of ancient Greece and Rome. More specifically, Classical refers to the style of Greek art that flourished during the fifth century B.C. 2. Any art based on a clear, rational, and regular structure, emphasizing horizontal and vertical directions, and organizing its parts with special emphasis on balance and proportion. The term classic is also used to indicate recognized excellence. Loosely, the term classical is often applied to all the art of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as to any art based on logical, rational principles and deliberate composition.
Clay Clichi Verre Cloisonne
1. Fine-grained earth materials formed by the decomposition of igneous rock; when combined with water, clay is plastic enough to be shaped; when dry, it is strong; when subjected to red heat or above, it will become progressively more dense and rock-like. 2. A compound of decomposed and altered feldspathic rock consisting of various hydrated silicates of aluminum along with non-plastics, such as quartz, and organic matter. It is also used as a source of alumina and silica in glazes.
Literally, glass negative. An artist produces a negative by drawing an image with a sharp instrument on the darkened, opaque surface of a dry or wet glass negative. The plate is then contact printed directly on to a sheet of light sensitive photographic paper or exposed under direct sunlight.
Enameling in which the colors are separated by thin metal ribbons or wires to maintain the pattern and keep the melting colors from running together.
Cocobolo Wood Coil Cold Cast Bronze
A wood with variegated orange, yellow and dark red color with irregular black stripes. Native to Mexico, Panama, Costa Rica, and Nicaragua.
A method of forming pottery or sculpture from rolls of clay that are smoothed together to form the sides of a jar or pot.
A modern method of casting sculptures in which the casting material is a resin mixed with powdered bronze. The finished sculpture has a surface which looks very similar to a traditionally cast bronze although it tends to be much lighter.
Cold Connected Cold Mounting Collage
The joining together two pieces of metal without the use of heat. Rivets or screws are examples of cold connections.
Method of attaching a photograph directly to a mount board using mounting tissue, a paper coated with glue. Cold mounting provides the photograph with a strong base, to protect it from bending or cracking.
A work of art made by pasting various materials such as bits of paper, cloth, etc. onto a piece of paper, board or canvas.
Collagraph Collogravure Color Field Painting
An intaglio printing process that uses a printing plate that has elements collaged to it. A collograph plate may also be used to make embossed prints.
The plate is covered with glue, and drawn into with any implement. When dry, it is inked, wiped and printed.
A style of painting prominent from the 1950s through the 1970s, featuring large fields or areas of color, meant to evoke an aesthetic or emotional response through the color alone. The movement grew out of Abstract Expressionism, in which large stained or painted areas or "fields of color evoke aesthetic and emotional responses.
Color Wheel Comb Commission
A circular grid that represents the colors based on color theory. This grid clearly shows the relationships colors have with each other (complimentary, opposite, etc.).
A decorative technique of dragging a tool across the surface of molten glass to distort an applied design. See also feathering.
To order an original work of art from an artist.
Complementary Colors Composition Compound Miter Joint
Two hues directly opposite one another on a color wheel which, when mixed together in proper proportions, produce a neutral gray. The true complement of a color can be seen in its afterimage. Colors that are opposite one another on the color wheel, such as red and green, or purple and yellow. Complementary colors create the strongest possible color contrast, and when placed in close proximity, each intensifies the appearance of the other.
The organization, design or placement of the individual elements in a work of art. The aim is to achieve balance and proportionality. Usually applied to two-dimensional art.
(furniture) A joint made by matching together multiple, overlapping angled edges to form a 90-degree corner. The overlapping edges give more strength than a standard miter joint, which matches together only two edges.
Computer-aided Design Conceptual Art Cone
Computer software that assists a user in producing drawings and layouts for engineering designs. Commonly referred to as CAD.
An art form in which the underlying idea or concept and the process by which it is achieved are more important than any tangible product. Art form in which the originating idea and the process by which it is presented take precedence over a tangible product. Conceptual works are sometimes produced in visible form, but they often exist only as descriptions of mental concepts or ideas. This trend developed in the late 1960s, in part as a way to avoid the commercialization of art.
Small pyramid of clay made to bend and melt at prescribed temperatures, providing a visual indication of the temperature in a kiln. Several cones with successively higher melting temperatures may be used at once to indicate the rising temperature in a kiln as it heats. Also known as a pyrometric cone.
Constructed Construction Constructivism
1. Hand made in parts and assembled to form a whole. 2. Not cast.
An art work that is actually assembled or built on the premises where it is to be shown. Many constructions are meant to be temporary and are disassembled after the exhibition is over.
This art movement originated in Russia in the early 20th century and typically characterizes sculptures made with industrial materials    metal, glass, plastic, etc., that emphasize space instead of mass.
Contact Print Cont Contemporary Art
A print made from either a negative or a positive in contact with photosensitive paper, film or plate.
Initially it was a trade name for a brand of French crayons made from a unique compound of pigments with a chalk binder. Conte crayons are free from grease, making them acceptable for lithographic drawing.
Generally defined as art that has been produced since the second half of the twentieth century.
Content Conti Crayon Contour
The message conveyed by a work of art - its subject matter and whatever the artist hopes to convey by that subject matter.
The trade name of French crayons that are grease-free and very chalky in texture.
A line that creates a boundary separating an area of space or object from the space around it.
Contrapposto Contrast Converging
A pose in which one part of the body twists away from the other with the weight of the figure balanced on one leg instead of two, exemplified in Michelangelo's David (1504). Literally, counterpoise. A method of portraying the human figure, especially in sculpture, often achieved by placing the weight on one foot and turning the shoulder so the figure appears relaxed and mobile. The result is often a graceful S-curve.
A dissimilarity between two or more colors. Value contrast is based on the relative lightness or darkness of the colors being compared; color contrast is based on their relative position on the color wheel.
Lines that go towards the same point.
Cool Colors Copper Copper Foil Technique
Those that suggest a sense of coolness. Blue , Green , Violet
A popular and versatile metal, known for its malleability, low cost, and wide range of patinas.
Joining glass by applying adhesive copper tape to each piece and soldering the copper together.
Core Cornwall Stone Counterbalanced Loom
1. The interior of a piece. 2. Frame or stuffing on or over which work can be supported; combustible core materials can burn out in the kiln; rigid cores should be removed before the clay shrinks.
A natural mineral containing feldspar, flint, clay and other materials. Primarily used as a flux. It can help reduce gas shrinkage in unfired and fired state. May contain fluorides which when fired release toxic fluorine gas.
A floor loom in which the shafts operate in tandem - as one shaft is raised, the connecting one is lowered. Also called a sinking-shed loom.
Countermarche Loom C-print Crackle
A floor loom in which the shafts can be pulled up or down independently.
To connect two rods or tubes end-to-end, making one long piece.
Decorative and intentional fissures netting the surface of a glaze due to a variation in the expansion and contraction of the glaze and the clay body.
Cradle Hinge Craft Craftsmanship
A hinge in which the individual knuckles are contained in a trough, or cradle.
The term craft defines the making of a work of art rather than its aesthetic qualities. Works that can be defined as crafts usually have a more practical function than those we think of purely as works of art.
Aptitude, skill, and manual dexterity in the use of tools and materials.
Craquelere Crawling Crayon
Literally, crackle. The overall pattern of fine cracks on a painting's surface resulting from age. Can be artificially induced.
Glaze that has separated into mounds on the clay surface during firing, generally caused by fluffy or high-shrink materials in the raw glaze; sometimes called alligator glaze.
A generic term for drawing stick. Usually made of a ground pigment in an oil, gum or wax medium.
Cross Pen Hammer Cross-draft Kiln Cross-hatching
Any wedge-shaped hammer face. These are used to push the metal in controlled directions when forging, riveting, raising, and setting stones.
Kiln with burners across from each other so that the atmosphere circulates in a criss-cross pattern and then up and down before exiting via a flue.
An area of closely spaced lines intersecting one another, used to create a sense of three-dimensionality on a flat surface, especially in drawing and printmaking. See also hatching, stippling.
Crown Setting Crystal Crystal(line) Glaze
A symmetrical prong setting that looks like a miniature crown.
1. Any glass that is clear; 2. glass that contains at least 4% lead in its formulation. Lead crystal is brighter than more common soda-lime glasses due to its higher index of refraction.
A glaze featuring clusters of crystal-like shapes or colors within a more uniform, opaque surface.
Cubism Cuir-bouilli Curly
A style of art pioneered in the early 20th century by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque. In the most developed form of Cubism, forms are fragmented into planes or geometric facets, like the facets in a diamond; these planes are rearranged to foster a pictorial, but not naturalistic, reality; forms may be viewed simultaneously from several vantage points; figure and background have equal importance; and the colors are deliberately restricted to a range of neutrals.
Literally, boiled leather. A general term for leather that is water-formed.
A term used to describe wood with a wavy grain pattern.
Curvilinear Cut glass Cuttlefish
Stressing the use of curved lines as opposed to rectilinear which stresses straight lines.
A style of glass with a design cut by a stone or copper wheel, leaving a frosted finish in the design. In contrast, brilliant cutting refers to glass with a polished design cut with a stone wheel.
A marine animal whose porous white skeleton is used as a mold in one kind of casting.
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