Join Our
Mailing List!









High Quality Customer Service

Home > Resources > Glossary > Definitions - B
Browse by Category
Balance Ball Clay Baluster
Band Saw Bangle Bar
Baroque Bas Relief Basalt Ware
Base Metal Basket Setting Batik
Bauhaus Beach Glass Beading
Bee's Wing Bentwood Beveled Glass
Bezel Bezel Pusher Bimetal
Binder Biomorphic Bird's Eye
Bisque Fire Bisque, Biscuit Bit
Bite Black and White Photos Bleb
Block Weave Blocking Blowhose
Blown Glass Blowpipe Bobbin
Body Boiling Bois D'arc Wood
Bon a tirer Bonded Glass Bone Ash
Bone China Bone Dry Bookmatching
Borosilicate Bowfront Box Camera
Box Catch Boxboard Brass
Brazing Briolette Bronze
Bronzing Powder Brushwork Bubinga Wood
Buffing Burl Burn Out
Burnish Burnisher Burnishing
Burr Butt Joint Byzantine Art
Balance Ball Clay Baluster
An arrangement of parts achieving a state of equilibrium between opposing forces or influences. Major types are symmetrical and asymmetrical.
A very fine-grained plastic secondary clay that fires to white or near white.
A small post, that may be turned, square or flat, that is used to support a rail or chair back.
Band Saw Bangle Bar
A power saw employing a continuous band of toothed metal.
A stiff bracelet that clasps on or slips over the wrist.
A single piece of glass created by fusing several canes or rods together. When cut into slices, all pieces will bear the same design and may be used as inlays or appliques, or in the making of mosaic glass.
Baroque Bas Relief Basalt Ware
The seventeenth-century period in Europe characterized in the visual arts by dramatic light and shade, turbulent composition, and exaggerated emotional expression.
Sculpture in which figures project only slightly from a background, as on a coin. Also known as low relief sculpture.
Baked unglazed stone ware, first developed by Wedgewood in England.
Base Metal Basket Setting Batik
Any metal other than a precious metal, such as copper or zinc.
Any stone setting characterized by an open grillwork around the lower part of the stone.
A fabric dyeing process, originated in Indonesia, using wax resists and dye on fabric in designs.
Bauhaus Beach Glass Beading
A design school founded by Walter Gropius in 1919 in Germany. The Bauhaus attempted to achieve reconciliation between the aesthetics of design and the more commercial demands of industrial mass production. Artists include Klee, Kandinsky, and Feininger.
A type of glass formed when glass bottles are left on a lake or ocean shore for a long period of time. Waves and sand act as a natural tumbler which smoothing out the glass and leaving a soft frosted surface.
Decorative detailing that resembles a row of flattened beads. The process whereby decorative beads are sewn, glued, or otherwise attached to a surface.
Bee's Wing Bentwood Beveled Glass
A wood term used to describe a grain pattern that has small and tight mottled figure similar in appearance to the wing of a bee.
A process commonly used in chair-making that uses steam to make wood pliable for shaping into furniture parts.
Plate glass that has its perimeter ground and polished at an angle.
Bezel Bezel Pusher Bimetal
A wall of metal that surrounds a gemstone and secures it in place.
A short piece of brass or steel set into a bulbous handle and used to press a bezel down onto a gemstone.
A double-sided sheet metal, composed of two different types of metal that have been rolled and fused together.
Binder Biomorphic Bird's Eye
A substance in paints that causes particles of pigment to adhere to one another and to a support such as oil or acrylic.
An abstract form whose contours are related to plant and animal shapes rather than to geometric shapes.
A highly decorative, mottled figure wood grain suggesting the eye of a bird; mainly seen in maple.
Bisque Fire Bisque, Biscuit Bit
The first firing of a clay. This fire drives out chemically combined water and carbonaceous materials prior to glazing.
Unglazed but fired ware, usually accomplished in a low temperature firing prior to the glaze fire; also applies to unglazed ware fired high, as in porcelain bisque.
A small bump of glass.
Bite Black and White Photos Bleb
Refers to how an acid bath eats away the unprotected surfaces of a prepared printing plate. The longer a surface is exposed to the acid, the deeper the bite.
Photography started as black and white, and although today we photograph in colors, many artist choose to return to the classic effect of a black and white photo. The artists themselves usually develop photographs in a special laboratory, and only a specific number of signed copies are made of each photo.
The small bump of solid glass on the end of a tube. This is formed when the tube has been sealed by pulling glass from the end.
Block Weave Blocking Blowhose
Any of several weave structures that produce patterns based on squares or rectangles.
Beginning stages of a method of forming metal shapes. A disc or other shape is hammered into a depression or mold in to begin breaking it into a form with a third dimension. (fiber) The process of moistening and shaping hand-woven textiles so that they conform to the desired shape. (glass) The use of a wooden form to shape glass during the glassblowing process. The block is kept wet and has a chilling effect on the hot glass.
A rubber hose, connected to a piece of glass tubing so that the tubing can be blown and shaped without being placed in one’s mouth.
Blown Glass Blowpipe Bobbin
Glasswork produced by the  process of gathering molten glass onto the end of a blowpipe and forming it into a variety of shapes by blowing air through the blowpipe and manipulating the glass as it is rotated.
An iron or steel tube for blowing glass. Usually about five feet long, a blowpipe has a mouthpiece at one end and is usually fitted at the other end with a metal ring that helps to retain a gather of glass.
A spool or quill around which warp thread is wound for weaving. Often the bobbin fits into a shuttle.
Body Boiling Bois D'arc Wood
A combination of natural clays and non-plastics, especially formulated to have certain workability and firing characteristics.
A water-forming technique in which leather is immersed for a short time in boiling water, causing the leather to bend and pucker. When dry, the leather is extremely hard, though fragile.
A wood that grows in the southern and central United States, and is known for its orange color and strength.
Bon a tirer Bonded Glass Bone Ash
Best of the Edition in a the process of creating a print. There is only one of these as it is the final one of the Artist's Proofs, the model of perfection which the whole edition will be identical to. Generally, once the printing of the whole edition is over, the artist destroys the matrix so that no additional prints can be made
Glass pieces that have been adhered together by glue, resin or cement.
The mineral calcium phosphate, or ash from bones; found in Europe and Asia and used in clay bodies; used as a glaze flux in the U.S.A.
Bone China Bone Dry Bookmatching
Porcelain of high translucency made with bone-ash, produced mainly in England and Japan; highly prized but not technically superior to feldspathic porcelain bodies made in the U.S.A.
The condition of unfired clay that has no absorbed moisture other than natural humidity.
The technique of using two specially sawn sections of wood, each piece nearly identical to the other and joined together along a center line, creating a symmetrical grain pattern.
Borosilicate Bowfront Box Camera
A type of glass originally formulated for constructing scientific apparatus.
Having an outward-curving front as in furniture or architecture.
An inexpensive, nearly cubical, roll-film camera, usually with limited or no adjustments in focus, shutter speed and aperture size.
Box Catch Boxboard Brass
A type of closure in which a springy "tongue" snaps into place in a snugly fitting box to secure a necklace or bracelet.
Corrugated paper board of varying thickness and density.
An alloy of copper and zinc. Brass is yellow in color, and though harder than either of its constituents, it is appropriately malleable for jewelry making.
Brazing Briolette Bronze
High-temperature soldering that yields a particularly strong joint.
A gemstone cut into a teardrop shape, with long triangular facets.
An alloy of copper and tin, sometimes containing small proportions of other elements such as zinc or phosphorus. It is stronger, harder, and more durable than brass, and has been used most extensively since antiquity for cast sculpture. Bronze alloys vary in color from a silvery hue to a rich, coppery red. U.S. standard bronze is composed of 90% copper, 7% tin, and 3% zinc.
Bronzing Powder Brushwork Bubinga Wood
Powder of bronze or brass alloys.
The characteristic way each artist brushes paint onto a support.
A light red or violet wood with fairly evenly spaced purple stripes. Native to western Africa.
Buffing Burl Burn Out
The final stage of creating a high polish, in which fine abrasives are rubbed against metal to smooth away minor surface irregularities. Buffing can be done with hand tools or machines.
A dome-shaped growth on the trunk of a tree; characterized by a strong distinctive grain, this wood is often used by wood turners and furniture makers as a special veneer or inlay.
The stage in the casting process when heat is used to cure the mold and remove the model.
Burnish Burnisher Burnishing
The use of a smooth object to polish the surface of leather-hard clay.
A polished steel or stone tool used to polish metal.
The act of rubbing greenware (clay) with any smooth tool to polish it, and tighten the surface.
Burr Butt Joint Byzantine Art
In prints and drawings, the textured, raised edge of a mark made by a burin (graver) that produces a soft line when printed. Burrs may be removed with a scraper.
A right angle created without mitering by joining the squared end of one piece of wood to the side or end of another piece of wood.
Styles of painting, design, and architecture developed from the fifth century A.D. in the Byzantine Empire of eastern Europe. Characterized in architecture by round arches, large domes, and extensive use of mosaic; characterized in painting by formal design, frontal and stylized figures, and a rich use of color, especially gold, in generally religious subject matter.

Glossary

  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z